musician

/musician

Gandhara in Darbari Kanada, the mother of all shrutis?

Post created 26 Feb 2015, last updated 24 January 2017. On my academia.edu page there is a pdf of this post, but it is not updated as often as this web page. Possibly the most famous of all shrutis of Hindustani classical music is the komal gandhara (ga, minor third [1]) of Darbari. It is often said to be ati-komal (extra flat), which would supposedly mean it is lower than an also supposedly 'normal' komal ga (Levy 1982: 109 cites Vilayat Khan, see also Parrikar 2000; my teacher Dilip Chandra Vedi considered this to be common knowledge, although there are [...]

Gandhara in Darbari Kanada, the mother of all shrutis? 2018-02-22T22:26:14+00:00

Conference on Cultural Musicology, January 24-25, 2014

FACULTY OF HUMANITIES DEPARTMENT OF MUSICOLOGY International Conference on Cultural Musicology 24-25 January 2014 University of Amsterdam Nieuwe doelenstraat 16 1012 CP Amsterdam On January 24-25, 2014 the musicology department of Amsterdam University organised an international conference about cultural musicology on the occasion of the retirement of Prof. Wim van der Meer. As a cultural anthropologist and a musicologist Wim van der Meer has contributed significantly to the field of cultural musicology. For the last thirteen years he and Prof. Rokus de Groot were at the very core of the [...]

Conference on Cultural Musicology, January 24-25, 2014 2018-02-25T09:02:24+00:00

Expressive vocalisms in Kesar Bai’s Lalita gauri

Illustrations of expressive moments in Kesar Bai Kerkar's famous recording of Lalita Gauri (1956). It is on the basis of audience response (interjections like "vah vah") that we consider these moments particularly emotive.¬†The first passage occurs around 140 seconds from the beginning of the recording. The ‚Äėwah‚Äô at the end follows immediately after the passage that goes from the major seventh through the extremely low minor second (143-44s) and ending on the tonic. The minor second is lower than 50 cents as we can well see in the graph, and [...]

Expressive vocalisms in Kesar Bai’s Lalita gauri 2018-03-30T08:44:58+00:00

Dilip Chandra Vedi

Dilip Chandra Vedi was born in 1901 and a contemporary of famous musicians like Omkarnath Thakur, Bade Gulam Ali Khan, Inayat Khan (sitar) and Nasiruddin Khan Dagar (dhrupad). The latter two were his close friends, he often travelled throughout India in their company, going to music festivals or ‚Äėconferences‚Äô. Vediji was a versatile musician and won many prizes in his prime. However, like so many other stalwards, he was not alert to the importance of making good deals with the recording companies. A few of his recordings are available (on [...]

Dilip Chandra Vedi 2018-03-30T08:39:42+00:00